A Closer Look Into Long Pet Nails – Its Dangerous Effects On Your Dog’s Back And Spine

Pet Dog Nails - The Many Dangers Of Long Pet NailsSome dog owners always dread the moment when they start hearing those little clicking noise when their dogs walk. Why? Well, that means that it’s time to clip the dog’s nails again.

Believe it or not, a lot of dog owners get really intimidated and scared of the pet nail clipping process. This is because for our canine buddies the process seems to be very unnatural and uncomfortable. This results in some dogs hating the process which can be very difficult for the pet owners.

But even if the process can be a bit intimidating at first it doesn’t mean that dog owners should immediately give-up on the idea. Clipping the dog’s nails is very important for their health and safety. Aside from injuries or accidents, long pet nails can also result in gait and spine related problems for your furry friend.

You may not be aware of this but the dog’s nails determine the type of surface they’re walking on. This in turn will decide how they walk and carry themselves. When a dog’s nails touch the ground it is telling them that they’re walking in an inclined plane. This will result on the dog’s back being hunched which will cause a strain and added pressure on the dog’s legs and back.

Long nails can also cause joint pain and even arthritis over time. Long dog nails can be compared to women who wear long heeled shoes. If some people who wear high heeled shoes can suffer from knee pains just imagine how your dog would feel if you neglect cutting their nails.

Active outdoor dogs may not need to have their nails trimmed because the nails can be worn down by walking, running or other activities. On the other hand, house dogs or indoor dogs will need to have their nails regularly trimmed.

If you’re having a hard time clipping your dog’s nails yourself using a dog nail trimmer then don’t worry. You can easily ask for some help from your vet or even bring your dog to the groomers to have them trim it for you.

But if you really want to do it by yourself then our tip would be to start slow. Get your dog used to having their paws touched and squeezed first. Allow them to inspect the nail trimmers and associate it with positive things such as treats or play time. Also bear in mind that you won’t have to clip all your dog’s nails in one go. If your dog is still getting used to it then you can do 1 – 3 nails at a time.

When you start to notice that your dog is getting distressed, stop, give treats and continue again some other time. Always finish the clipping process in a positive note. It may take a while for the dog to get used to have their nails clipped but it is definitely possible to have a well behaved dog during this process. We also suggest that you choose sharp pet nail clippers for this task for a smoother and faster clipping activity.

We hope that you see the importance of clipping your dog’s nails. Remember that you will need to start clipping your dog’s nails once you start hearing those clicking noise when they walk. If you don’t have any experience with dog nail clipping then don’t be afraid to ask for help from your vet or a pet groomer.

Written by Caroline

Caroline

Caroline is an avid dog lover and writer who was always in the company of dogs growing up. Today, she owns 2 dogs and supports several rescue shelters and shares her dog experiences and knowledge whenever she can.

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