Healthier And Happier Dogs – Learn More About Spaying Or Neutering Your Canine Pals

The benefits of spaying and neutering your petsAs a dog owner, one of the most important decisions you will have to make is whether or not to have your dog spayed/neutered. Although we advocate this procedure we do respect pet owners who decide not to have their dogs go through this process.

If you do decide not to have your dog spayed/neutered be sure that you’ll be able to take care of your dog’s puppies if she does get pregnant. Bear in mind that there is currently an overpopulation of dogs in the United States.

Owners who are not capable of taking care of these puppies usually send them to rescue shelters which may ultimately result to them being put down if they’re not adopted.

So, although puppies are cute little creatures, please be sure that you are capable of caring for them before you decide to keep your dog “intact”. But we’re getting a bit ahead of ourselves. Before you decide to have your dog “fixed” or to keep them “intact” let’s talk about spaying/neutering.

What is spaying/neutering?

Spaying is the basic term used for the process of surgically removing the female dog’s uterus and ovaries (ovariohysterectomy). Neutering, on the other hand, is the basic term used for the castration of the male dog.

This will mean that your male dog will not be able to get any dog pregnant and totally eliminates the risk of pregnancy for your female dog.

Is the procedure safe?

Like any other surgical procedure, there are some risks to have your dogs “fixed”. That said, the likelihood of having any problems or complications during the surgery is very low provided that your dog is in good health. This may vary from dog to dog so be sure to talk to your vet first before going through the procedure.

What are the benefits of spaying/neutering?

There are definitely a lot of benefits that you and your dog can gain from going through this process. Aside from eliminating any risks of unexpected dog pregnancy, your dog’s roaming tendencies will significantly go down. The dog will also be healthier. The procedure can prevent testicular cancer for male dogs and can even totally eliminate the risk of your female dog from getting Pyometra. Dogs that are fixed are also said to be better behaved compared to those that are intact.

When is the best time to have your dog fixed?

When going through the procedure the younger the dog the better. Most vets usually recommend that the puppy be at least 8 weeks old for the surgery.

Who is able to perform the procedure?

It is important that you only let an experienced and licensed Veterinarian handle your dog. Never settle for anything less to ensure that your furry companion is in good hands during the procedure.

Again let us remind you that currently there are 6 – 8 million dogs that are currently homeless and are in rescue shelters. The sad thing is that not all are “no kill” shelters. A lot of dogs end up being put down due to unplanned dog pregnancies. Let us help reduce this problem by being responsible dog owners.

As mentioned above, if you think you are capable of caring for your dog when she gets pregnant and has puppies then you may decide not to go through with the process. On the other hand, please do note that there a lot of benefits to get your dog fixed as well.

We really urge pet owners everywhere to definitely give this a second thought and to spread the word so that we can help reduce the problem of overpopulation in dogs. If you’re still unsure of the process please don’t hesitate to contact your vet and to talk to them about the procedure.

Written by Caroline

Caroline

Caroline is an avid dog lover and writer who was always in the company of dogs growing up. Today, she owns 2 dogs and supports several rescue shelters and shares her dog experiences and knowledge whenever she can.

Comments

  1. STEELE HONDA says:

    Thanks for explaining what is spaying/neutering and describing what the process is. I really enjoyed how you explained that the process is safe and is actually better for the dog. I debated about getting my dog fixed but i soon saw the advantages of getting my dog spayed/neutered as my dog was a lot more calm and relax. Great post!

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