How To Prevent Bad Breath In Dogs Plus Why It’s Important To Brush Your Dog’s Teeth

Important reasons why it's important to brush your dog's teeth regularly
Brushing your dog’s teeth is an integral part of dog grooming. This has as much importance as dog bathing and brushing your dog’s coat.

Yes, it may sound a bit funny and strange but all vets and professional dog groomers will tell you the same thing if you ask them. Tooth brushing can help your dog’s overall health the same way that it does for us humans.

Periodontal and gum disease is very common nowadays in dogs. The only surefire way to prevent this from happening is by regularly brushing your dog’s teeth.

Some dog owners would argue that they can use raw hides, greenies and other chew toys for this. Yes, these things can help your dog’s teeth but only to some extent. This is why there is definitely no real substitute to this activity.

If you’re not convinced that brushing your dog’s teeth is completely necessary then here are some more reasons to help you understand.

To prevent oral and dental disease

As mentioned above, dogs can also develop certain dental and oral diseases such as periodontal disease, plaque, tartar, gingivitis and many others. Not only will these problems be painful for your dogs in the long run but it also has a tendency to spread and affect different parts of their body.

Periodontal disease, for example, causes your dog’s tooth to fall out one by one which can be very painful for them. Dogs with this type of problem will still have the appetite but eating will be very hard for them. Some dogs will even drop the food from their mouth and drool excessively because of it.

Also, poor dog dental care can lead to serious, even fatal systemic infections.

To avoid bad doggy breath

This point is not on the list simply because you want your dog to have fresh and nice smelling breath. Halitosis or commonly referred to as bad breath has different causes and effects on your dog. Most of the time bad doggy breath can be a symptom of something more serious such as periodontal disease, pharyngitis and tonsillitis.

If you’re dog’s breath is starting to smell then it’s definitely the right time for you to get started on the dog brushing activity. If your dog’s breath smells really bad then it might be best to consult with the vet.

To prevent wearing out your dog’s teeth

Dog’s teeth are known to be pretty tough. They use it for a variety of things such as eating, picking things up, playing, chewing and many more. But having said that, these strong teeth can wear down if not properly cared for. The wearing out of your dog’s teeth may not sound much but just like periodontal disease it can be very painful.

As you can see, taking care of your dog’s teeth is equally as important as brushing their coat using a slicker brush and giving them a bath. Oral and dental problems may take a few years to develop but will you really wait for your dog’s breath to start smelling bad before making your move?

In this case, prevention is definitely better than cure.

Brushing your dog’s teeth at least 2 – 3 times a week can be a good rule to follow. The activity may seem a bit awkward for you and your dog at first but with the help of treats and patience it will become easier and more natural in no time.

Written by Caroline

Caroline

Caroline is an avid dog lover and writer who was always in the company of dogs growing up. Today, she owns 2 dogs and supports several rescue shelters and shares her dog experiences and knowledge whenever she can.

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